It’s always Day 2 at Staples

It’s been over two months since Runa was acquired and we became Staples Innovation Lab. I’ve been meaning to write about this transition, but things have just been so busy. I do think it’s important that I record this journey though, because in a few years time, people will look around and will wonder at the steep rise of Staples. 🙂

We started Runa with the same gleam in our eyes as most Silicon Valley startups – of changing the face of the industry we were in. We chose e-commerce, even though in 2008, it wasn’t exactly sexy. Those were the years of the consumer startups, and no one was even looking at enterprise focused deals. My own viewpoint though was, and still is, that the e-commerce story is still being written. I’m an Amazon.com shareholder, I’ve been using their service ever since I moved to this country over 10 years ago, and I’m a huge fanboy. My appreciation for Jeff Bezos is paralleled only by my admiration for Steve Jobs. Amazon.com has literally defined e-commerce… and is overwhelming every other contender in the space. 

So we started Runa with one overarching goal. To help e-commerce merchants survive the Amazon.com onslaught. The idea was that most retailers aren’t technology companies, and don’t have the capabilities to battle Amazon, one of the most advanced tech companies in the world. Further, these folks are unlikely to ever grow such capabilities in-house, for a whole variety of reasons. At Runa, we built out a set of SaaS products, each focused on a specific area. All these services were built on top of a big-data + machine-learning stack. Our output was a run-time platform that ran predictive models to address individual aspects of the shopping experience. Merchants simply plugged our APIs into their world, and we enabled their site.

For instance, we built PerfectOffer to help merchants stop giving away discounts, indiscriminately, to everyone. Our platform built sophisticated statistical models of the behavior of the shoppers, and then in real-time would determine which shopper should get what deal on what product. Or even if they should get an offer at all. Not only was the discount spend made far more efficient (which helped average gross margins), but it also had a highly non-linear positive impact on net margins. Another service we built was called PerfectShipping, which used past seller performance and shipment tracking data to figure out when shoppers could expect to receive their items, with a high degree of confidence, even if merchants used the cheapest carrier services. Online marketplaces and retailers alike used this to take on Amazon Prime’s 2-day free shipping, and the incremental sales numbers this service generated for our large merchants was incredible. Other services included PerfectEmail and PerfectBundles.

By the time Runa was acquired, we were able to count some very large retailers as our customers, including eBay, Groupon, and Target. In July this year, we added Staples. Now, to be clear, we had never thought Staples was a particularly relevant company… actually, I had never really given much thought to Staples at all. However, once they became a customer, I did find out a fair bit about them, and things seemed quite impressive. It turns out, Staples is the world’s second largest e-commerce player, after Amazon.com. Sure, it’s a distant second, but it does make over 10 billion dollars a year online. Remember, this is despite them not being a tech company. Not in any realistic sense of the word.

So when they talked to us about a strategic partnership, and they described where they wanted to go, I realized that this could be an incredible opportunity. My vision for Runa was always this set of AI programs that would drive all aspects of an e-commerce operation. We would use data to optimize just about everything, and all in real-time, all automated. This would drive down costs, and would then allow for lower margins, which would mean cheaper prices for shoppers. And all the while, it would have the amazing side-effect of improving the customer experience. Staples, in my mind, was the perfect place to put this into action. Kind of like a PerfectPlayground 🙂

Staples is an old company – they’re 27 years old, and they’re still a brick-n-mortar retailer at heart. This is changing, and there’s a lot to be done. The reality though is that it was a startup at one point, and that entrepreneurial spirit is still alive. The first phase of the company, in a sense, was the retailer phase, and they opened thousands of stores around the world. All are (or certainly were) amazing cash-generating machines, and even today, even as the the face of stores business is changing, they’ll continue to generate the cash needed to help the overall company as a whole.

I like to think of the offline business as Day 1 for Staples, and we’re now on Day 2. This is going to be a long day, since we’re never going to be done. The good news is that there’s tremendous upside as we execute on this path to becoming a technology company ourselves. There’s much work to be done, and much software to be written. There are plenty of business processes to change. There are plenty of people to win over, Wall Street analysts included. The glory is in the challenge, of course, and this is one heck of a challenge. How does one attempt to build what a company like Amazon.com has built over the past 15 years (at least the relevant e-commerce bits) in a span of just 2-3 years? This is a tech challenge, a people challenge, a process challenge, and a business challenge. It means we can’t do things in the typical, traditional manner. We’ve made very different technology choices (Lisp, anyone?) and are asking all the crazy people we can find, the doers, to join us. The enemy is formidable, but one thing’s for sure: it’s going to be one hell of a fight.

It’s always Day 2 at Staples.

Product/Market Fit to include a minimally viable business

(Via Zolo Labs)

Product/Market Fit to include a minimally viable business:

Yesterday, Siva and I had coffee with Bradford Cross, the co-founder of Prismatic. We caught up on all the things we’re up to recently, mainly about the startups we’re involved with. As you’re probably aware, he’s doing amazing work at Prismatic, and they’re totally blowing up. He had a ton of great advice for folks getting started on new stuff, but here’s one thing that really stood out.

Distribution

For some context, distribution is the answer to the question of “what is the plan to acquire users?” The typical Lean Startup process focuses first on product/market fit, and you don’t worry about scaling distribution until you actually have something that users get value from. Which makes sense; if you don’t have a product that delivers value to at least some people, you can’t have a viable business.

However, Brad’s point was that that is rather late in the process to start thinking about distribution. Folks should be paying attention to distribution right from the beginning, even during MVP development. One part of that is thinking about your voice and your conversation with your potential audience, your outbound marketing, campaign-based user-acquisition, and so on. But it also means planning (and maybe even implementing) features for your product that can organically increase sign ups. 

The common feature people add to address this (and in fact, hope to become “viral” from it), is social publishing and sharing. The problem with this is that there is too much of it – most applications let you share/invite others, and the question becomes why anyone would want to do this with your product. And why would the person on the receiving end even care.

The  answer is obvious – in order for there to be a successful outcome, there needs to be explicit value to both sides. It is your job to figure out what these features are for your product.

Minimal Viable Business = MVP + Distribution

So here’s the bottom line: it’s as important to figure out your product/market fit as it is to figure out that you have a viable (scalable) business. After all, you may have a lifestyle business, and just not know it. By thinking about this  as early in the game as possible, you’ll be better positioned to plan a blow up.

Tagged: distribution, mvp, startup