Why Datomic?

Cross-posted from Zololabs.

Many of you know we’re using Datomic for all our storage needs for Zolodeck. It’s an extremely new database (not even version 1.0 yet), and is not open-source. So why would we want to base our startup on something like it, especially when we have to pay for it? I’ve been asked this question a number of  times, so I figured I’d blog about my reasons:

  • I’m an unabashed fan of Clojure and Rich Hickey
  • I’ve always believed that databases (and the insane number of optimization options) could be simpler
  • We get basically unlimited read scalability (by upping read throughput in Amazon DynamoDB)
  • Automatic built-in caching (no more code to use memcached (makes DB effectively local))
  • Datalog-as-query language (declarative logic programming (and no explicit joins))
  • Datalog is extensible through user-defined functions
  • Full-text search (via Lucene) is built right in
  • Query engine on client-side, so no danger from long-running or computation-heavy queries
  • Immutable data – audits all versions everything automatically
  • “As of” queries and “time-window” queries are possible
  • Minimal schema (think RDF triples (except Datomic tuples also include the notion of time)
  • Supports cardinality out of the box (has-many or has-one)
  • These reference relationships are bi-directional, so you can traverse the relationship graph in either direction
  • Transactions are first-class (can be queried or “subscribed to” (for db-event-driven designs))
  • Transactions can be annotated (with custom meta-data) 
  • Elastic 
  • Write scaling without sharding (hundreds of thousands of facts (tuples) per second)
  • Supports “speculative” transactions that don’t actually persist to datastore
  • Out of the box support for in-memory version (great for unit-testing)
  • All this, and not even v1.0
  • It’s a particularly good fit with Clojure (and with Storm)

This is a long list, but perhaps begins to explain why Datomic is such an amazing step forward. Ping me with questions if you have ’em! And as far as the last point goes, I’ve talked about our technology choices and how they fit in with each other at the Strange Loop conference last year. Here’s a video of that talk.